Introduction

The gut system’s primary function is to make sure that the consumed food that a person eats is digested in the stomach, and the intestines (both large and small) and is absorbed into nutrients for the entire body to stay functional. The gut microbiota makes sure that the body’s energy, growth, metabolism, and immune support are doing their jobs correctly and that the bacteria in the gut are thriving. When harmful bacteria start to disrupt the balance in the intestines, it can cause many chronic gut disorders in the gut system. However, incorporating probiotics into a healthy diet can help alleviate the symptoms by dampening their effects on the gut. In this 2 part series, we will be looking at how probiotics can help dampen the impact of gut disorders. Part 1 looked at what probiotics are and how they alter the gut microbiome. By referring patients to qualified and skilled providers who specialize in gastroenterology services. To that end, and when appropriate, we advise our patients to refer to our associated medical providers based on their examination. We find that education is the key to asking valuable questions to our providers. Dr. Alex Jimenez DC provides this information as an educational service only. Disclaimer

 

Can my insurance cover it? Yes, it may. If you are uncertain, here is the link to all the insurance providers we cover. If you have any questions, please call Dr. Jimenez at 915-850-0900.

How Probiotics Help The Gut Microbiota

 

The gut microbiota makes sure that the entire body is functioning properly by regulating the body’s growth, metabolism, and immune support. When probiotics enter the gut system, they provide a protective barrier to prevent intestinal permeability from getting disrupted. Research studies have found that intestinal microbes can convert dietary nutrients into metabolites. When probiotics are introduced into the gut microbiota and can help restore the composition of the gut. When there are factors that can affect the probiotic function, they are often defined as subjects that are “permissive” or “resistant” to probiotic strains based on:

Other research studies have found that probiotics are live microorganisms found in fermented foods with many beneficial properties for the gut microbiota. Probiotics exhibit a variety of health beneficial properties for the gut as these microorganisms can prevent bowel diseases, improve the immune system, and prevent intestinal disorders’ effects on the digestive system.


Helping The Gut With Bugs

Research studies have found that probiotics play many significant roles in the gut microbiota composition while also inhibiting the colonization of pathogenic bacteria in the intestines. Since the gut microbiota contains a rich, diverse microbial ecosystem that can influence the health of the human body, so adding probiotics to combat the overflow of harmful bacteria infesting the intestinal walls can provide beneficial relief and help regulate the gut microbiota. The probiotics will also help the body build a healthy intestinal mucosa protective layer while enhancing the immune system. Because of the close relationship between the immune system and the gut microbiota, probiotics are highly effective in improving immunity and regulating the gut microbiome.


Therapeutic Uses For Probiotics On Gut Disorders

Since the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is home to trillions of bacteria (both good and bad), there must be a balance between good and bad bacteria. These bacteria ensure that the gut microbiota is working correctly and prevent chronic gut disorders from inflicting on the intestinal wall barriers. Research studies have stated that the perturbation of the bacterial microflora of the GI tract may play an essential role in the pathophysiology of GI disorders. Using probiotics as a part of a healthy diet can help dampen the effects of GI disorders by regulating the gut flora back to normal. Some of the therapeutic use that probiotics can help the gut microbiota when it comes to gut disorders include:

  • Constipation
  • Diarrhea (traveler’s, AAD, CDAD)
  • IBS/SIBO
  • IBD
  • Candida
  • H.pylori
  • GERD
  • Intestinal Permeability

 

Probiotics & IBD

 

Research studies have found that an altercation of the mucosal immune response to bacterial agents will lead to chronic intestinal inflammation that can characterize IBD (inflammatory bowel disease). Probiotics are safe for most individuals who have IBD and those with IBS (irritable bowel syndrome). Other research studies have stated that when IBD individuals start to take probiotics can help normalize the gut barrier function and reduce the pro-inflammatory cytokines while lessening the disease. By taking probiotics, many individuals suffering from IBD will notice that their symptoms will diminish over time and that there will be positive outcomes seen at both low and high doses.

 

Conclusion

The gut system’s main job is to make sure that the food is being digested into nutrients and absorbed into the bloodstream to be transported throughout the entire body. When harmful pathogens enter the gut system, they can cause many digestive disorders that can upset the bacterial balance in the gut flora. When left untreated, it can develop into chronic gut diseases over time, causing the individual pain. Incorporating probiotics into a person’s diet can provide the beneficial results that a person needs. Probiotics can help replenish the healthy gut bacteria back to normal while dampening the effects of gut disorders from reoccurring in the intestinal tract. When individuals use probiotics as part of their diet, their gut will start to feel better and without pain.

 

References

Guandalini, Stefano, and Naire Sansotta. “Probiotics in the Treatment of Inflammatory Bowel Disease.” Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology, U.S. National Library of Medicine, 2019, https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/30632114/.

Hemarajata, Peera, and James Versalovic. “Effects of Probiotics on Gut Microbiota: Mechanisms of Intestinal Immunomodulation and Neuromodulation.” Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology, SAGE Publications, Jan. 2013, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3539293/.

Jonkers, Daisy, and Reinhold Stockbrügger. “Probiotics and Inflammatory Bowel Disease.” Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine, The Royal Society of Medicine, Apr. 2003, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC539443/.

Shi, Lye Huey, et al. “Beneficial Properties of Probiotics.” Tropical Life Sciences Research, Penerbit Universiti Sains Malaysia, Aug. 2016, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5031164/.

Verna, Elizabeth C, and Susan Lucak. “Use of Probiotics in Gastrointestinal Disorders: What to Recommend?” Therapeutic Advances in Gastroenterology, SAGE Publications, Sept. 2010, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3002586/.

Wang, Xinzhou, et al. “Probiotics Regulate Gut Microbiota: An Effective Method to Improve Immunity.” Molecules (Basel, Switzerland), MDPI, 8 Oct. 2021, https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC8512487/.

Disclaimer

Disclaimers

Professional Scope of Practice *

The information herein on "How Probiotics Dampen Gut Disorders | Part 2" is not intended to replace a one-on-one relationship with a qualified health care professional, or licensed physician, and is not medical advice. We encourage you to make your own healthcare decisions based on your research and partnership with a qualified healthcare professional.

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Our information scope is limited to Chiropractic, musculoskeletal, physical medicines, wellness, contributing etiological viscerosomatic disturbances within clinical presentations, associated somatovisceral reflex clinical dynamics, subluxation complexes, sensitive health issues, and/or functional medicine articles, topics, and discussions.

We provide and present clinical collaboration with specialists from a wide array of disciplines. Each specialist is governed by their professional scope of practice and their jurisdiction of licensure. We use functional health & wellness protocols to treat and support care for the injuries or disorders of the musculoskeletal system.

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Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CCST, IFMCP*, CIFM*, ATN*

email: coach@elpasofunctionalmedicine.com

Licensed in: Texas & New Mexico*

Dr. Alex Jimenez DC, MSACP, CIFM*, IFMCP*, ATN*, CCST
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